Coping With Covid-19: Mental Health Providers Turn To Telemedicine

AS COVID-19 causes widespread fear and anxiety throughout the United States, unfortunately, the impact will be more pronounced on individuals with current mental disorders such as depression and anxiety. Based on data by the National Institute of Mental Health, about 18% of people struggle with an anxiety disorder and 7% will have at least one major depressive episode. In other words, a lot of people struggle with these conditions.

On top of all that, there is a public health push for social distancing to slow the spread of COVID-19, which includes holding off on most appointments with their current health professionals unless is urgent. The good news is there are new ways to connect with your therapist from the comfort of your home. Many therapists are now offering counseling through telehealth, also known as teletherapy.

Cells in the immune system have the same type of structure as the cells in the nervous system, and the distinction between them is something they came up with. It’s now clear that signal molecules in the immune system also transmit to the nervous system.  This is huge and it may revolutionize healthcare in more ways than we can imagine. Also, mentally ill individuals tend to be more susceptible to immune system disorders and inflammations. So, this suggests that there is a connection. There is also research that proves individuals that were neglected during childhood tend to be more susceptible to various diseases in the immune system.

Coping Tips

Some things you can do to cope with COVID-19 include:

  • Limit on negative media consumption whether that’s national news or social media.
  • Stay active. Try to get enough sleep or rest.
  • Stay hydrated and avoid too much caffeine or alcohol.
  • Eat healthy if possible and based on the options avaible.
  • Get accurate health information from reliable sources.

Depression and anxiety make people feel they are not in control of their lives. One thing you can do is make a schedule and stick to it. When you organize and structure your life, you are more in control of the outcome. This includes a family routine. This is good, especially for your kids, to know what they can expect from you and that no matter what, they can count on you. Keep it consistent and live plenty of room to enjoy the things that matter the most to you.

Establishing healthy routines can boost your physical and emotional health during difficult times. For example, some research suggests that people who make their beds regularly tend to feel happier and more productive. Such a simple task. Right? But it’s often the little things that make life grand.

What about insurance coverage?

In general, many health insurance plans cover mental health and also substance abuse disorders. Plans sold in the marketplace, for example, are required to cover mental health and substance use disorder services. Likewise, all state Medicaid programs and the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) provide mental health services. Medicare also covers mental health services. Look at your plan enrollment materials to learn about your coverage levels. We can help you enroll in a health plan that meets your needs.

The bottom line is having emotional balance can boost your immune system. Yes, more research is required but at least this is the beginning. This kind of research takes time. Some prestigious universities around the world are working on it and the first results should be available in four to five years.

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